Historical Hall of Fame:  Carole L. Nash (b. ___) is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Shenandoah National Park Environmental
Archaeology Program at the James Madison University
Virginia History Series
Dr. Carole L. Nash is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrated Science and Technology at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia.
 
She earned her Ph.D. in anthropology from the Catholic University of America. Her MA is in Applied Philosophy from  Bowling Green State University, and her B.S. with Honors is from James Madison University
 
As a geographic science professor, Carole Nash is director of the Shenandoah National Park Environmental Archaeology Program. She has 30 years experience in cultural resource management with the National Park Service, National Forest Service, Commonwealth of Virginia and with various private firms.
 
Dr. Nash has written over 100 technical research reports and serves on the Board of Directors of the Council of Virginia Archaeologist where she is its Treasurer and chair of the Professional Archaeologist Certification Committee.
 
As a professional archaeologist and educator, Dr. Nash has organized, managed, and participated as a presenter in many conferences for professionals in the Tri-state area (i.e., Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia).  In 2001, Carole was given the Professional Archaeologist Award by the Archeology Society of Virginia.
 
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Typical
Publication:
2005 "Late Woodland Villages in the Allegheny Mountains Region of Southwestern Pennsylvania: Temporal and Social Implications of New Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Dates. Uplands Archaeology in the East VII and IX", edited by Carole L. Nash and Michael B. Barber, pp. 13-23. Archeological Society of Virginia Special Publication 38-7
Nash sifting for artifacts (rt)  (middle) JMU students participating in a 25-year-old summer archaeological field school at Big Meadows, Virginia give public tours of their"digs" -- a place that supervising  anthropology professor Carole Nash describes as "a world heritage ecological site"  (far rt) JMU President "digs" at Big  Meadows